Documentation (master)

Testing

Testing is one of the most important parts of developing an application. Fastify is very flexible when it comes to testing and is compatible with most testing frameworks (such as Tap, which is used in the examples below).

Let's cd into a fresh directory called 'testing-example' and type npm init -y in our terminal.

run npm install fastify && npm install tap pino-pretty --save-dev

Separating concerns makes testing easy

First we're going to separate our application code from our server code:

app.js:

'use strict'

const fastify = require('fastify')

function build(opts={}) {
  const app = fastify(opts)
  app.get('/', async function (request, reply) {
    return { hello: 'world' }
  })

  return app
}

module.exports = build

server.js:

'use strict'

const server = require('./app')({
  logger: {
    level: 'info',
    prettyPrint: true
  }
})

server.listen(3000, (err, address) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err)
    process.exit(1)
  }
})

Benefits of using fastify.inject()

Fastify comes with built-in support for fake http injection thanks to light-my-request.

Before introducing any tests, we'll use the .inject method to make a fake request to our route:

app.test.js:

'use strict'

const build = require('./app')

const test = async () => {
  const app = build()

  const response = await app.inject({
    method: 'GET',
    url: '/'
  })

  console.log('status code: ', response.statusCode)
  console.log('body: ', response.body)
}
test()

First, our code will run inside an asynchronous function, giving us access to async/await.

.inject insures all registered plugins have booted up and our application is ready to test. Lastly we pass the request method we want to use and a route. Using await we can store the response without a callback.

Run the test file in your terminal node app.test.js

status code:  200
body:  {"hello":"world"}

Testing with http injection

Now we can replace our console.log calls with actual tests!

In your package.json change the "test" script to:

"test": "tap --reporter=list --watch"

app.test.js:

'use strict'

const { test } = require('tap')
const build = require('./app')

test('requests the "/" route', async t => {
  const app = build()

  const response = await app.inject({
    method: 'GET',
    url: '/'
  })
  t.strictEqual(response.statusCode, 200, 'returns a status code of 200')
})

Finally run npm test in the terminal and see your test results!

The inject method can do much more than a simple GET request to a URL:

fastify.inject({
  method: String,
  url: String,
  query: Object,
  payload: Object,
  headers: Object,
  cookies: Object
}, (error, response) => {
  // your tests
})

.inject methods can also be chained by omitting the callback function:

fastify
  .inject()
  .get('/')
  .headers({ foo: 'bar' })
  .query({ foo: 'bar' })
  .end((err, res) => { // the .end call will trigger the request
    console.log(res.payload)
  })

or in the promisified version

fastify
  .inject({
    method: String,
    url: String,
    query: Object,
    payload: Object,
    headers: Object,
    cookies: Object
  })
  .then(response => {
    // your tests
  })
  .catch(err => {
    // handle error
  })

Async await is supported as well!

try {
  const res = await fastify.inject({ method: String, url: String, payload: Object, headers: Object })
  // your tests
} catch (err) {
  // handle error
}

Another Example:

app.js

const Fastify = require('fastify')

function buildFastify () {
  const fastify = Fastify()

  fastify.get('/', function (request, reply) {
    reply.send({ hello: 'world' })
  })

  return fastify
}

module.exports = buildFastify

test.js

const tap = require('tap')
const buildFastify = require('./app')

tap.test('GET `/` route', t => {
  t.plan(4)

  const fastify = buildFastify()

  // At the end of your tests it is highly recommended to call `.close()`
  // to ensure that all connections to external services get closed.
  t.tearDown(() => fastify.close())

  fastify.inject({
    method: 'GET',
    url: '/'
  }, (err, response) => {
    t.error(err)
    t.strictEqual(response.statusCode, 200)
    t.strictEqual(response.headers['content-type'], 'application/json; charset=utf-8')
    t.deepEqual(response.json(), { hello: 'world' })
  })
})

Testing with a running server

Fastify can also be tested after starting the server with fastify.listen() or after initializing routes and plugins with fastify.ready().

Example:

Uses app.js from the previous example.

test-listen.js (testing with Request)

const tap = require('tap')
const request = require('request')
const buildFastify = require('./app')

tap.test('GET `/` route', t => {
  t.plan(5)

  const fastify = buildFastify()

  t.tearDown(() => fastify.close())

  fastify.listen(0, (err) => {
    t.error(err)

    request({
      method: 'GET',
      url: 'http://localhost:' + fastify.server.address().port
    }, (err, response, body) => {
      t.error(err)
      t.strictEqual(response.statusCode, 200)
      t.strictEqual(response.headers['content-type'], 'application/json; charset=utf-8')
      t.deepEqual(JSON.parse(body), { hello: 'world' })
    })
  })
})

test-ready.js (testing with SuperTest)

const tap = require('tap')
const supertest = require('supertest')
const buildFastify = require('./app')

tap.test('GET `/` route', async (t) => {
  const fastify = buildFastify()

  t.tearDown(() => fastify.close())

  await fastify.ready()

  const response = await supertest(fastify.server)
    .get('/')
    .expect(200)
    .expect('Content-Type', 'application/json; charset=utf-8')
  t.deepEqual(response.body, { hello: 'world' })
})

How to inspect tap tests

  1. Isolate your test by passing the {only: true} option
    test('should ...', {only: true}, t => ...)
  2. Run tap using npx
    > npx tap -O -T --node-arg=--inspect-brk test/<test-file.test.js>
  • -O specifies to run tests with the only option enabled
  • -T specifies not to timeout (while you're debugging)
  • --node-arg=--inspect-brk will launch the node debugger
  1. In VS Code, create and launch a Node.js: Attach debug configuration. No modification should be necessary.

Now you should be able to step through your test file (and the rest of fastify) in your code editor.